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Fashion

The "Gucci Places" To Visit On Your Next Vacation

From Los Angeles to Seoul and a cemetery to a 19th century bookstore, make a pit-stop at these locations that have inspired the Florentine house in one way or another, as you traverse the world.

#1: Daelim Museum, Seoul, South Korea

Image: artist Coco Capitan for Gucci

Currently housing an exhibition by artist Coco Capitan, the Daelim Museum is located in the Jongno district of Seoul, and currently has on display over 150 works by Gucci’s Spanish collaborator in what is her first solo exhibit in Asia, titled Is It Tomorrow Yet?. If Gucci’s Fall/Winter ’17 viral logo tees, jumpers and hoodies scrawled with Capitan’s favoured witty statements like “What are we going to do with all this future? and “Common sense is not that common” is anything to go by, expect more of her wryly quotidian humour to be on display till end Jan.

#2: Antica Libreria Cascianelli, Rome, Italy

Image: artist Silvia Calderoni for Gucci

With the recent scent range inspired by old apothecaries that Gucci has put out, it’s not hard to imagine Alessandro Michele in Rome’s Antica Libreria Cascianelli — a bookstore founded in the 1800s — sifting through the yellowed pages of century-old books and curious objects. The old world haunt looks to be everything you’d imagine it to be: blown-glass bookcases lined with first edition tomes ranging literature, history and medicine, a bookshelf that leads into a hidden backroom (said to have hosted secret meetings), and an impressive cast that’ve stepped through its doors — Greta Garbo and Aristotle Onassis to name but a few.

#3: The Boboli Gardens, Florence, Italy

Image: insect breeder Adrian Kozakiewicz for Gucci

This UNESCO World Heritage Site first came up in the 16th century, and was expanded by Italy’s famous Medici and Lorraine families in subsequent years. Now an open-air museum, its peppered with famous sculptures by the likes of Italian sculptors Giambologna and Vincenzo de Rossi, and you’ll even see ‘Michelangelo’s Prisoners’ too, albeit copies — though it used to house the real deal back in the day.

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