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Fashion

#SupportLocal: Our Directory Of Singapore Fashion Brands To Know

In these times, the fashion brands that need the most love are our independent homegrown labels. In this list – that will grow – we shine the spotlight on the names you ought to know and what you can expect from each of them.
1. Youths In Balaclava
Hit this up for: Utilitarian-inspired streetwear.   Who’s behind it: This 13-member Adrian Joffe-endorsed Singaporean design collective may have only been introduced to the fashion world three years ago, but they’ve already got a list of impressive accolades to their name. Think: fronting a global Converse campaign, hosting a wildly successful pop-up store, and as of late, debuting their Spring/Summer 2020 collection ‘Lost In Transit’ at Paris Fashion Week.   What: With Youth In Balaclava’s championing of individuality comes clothes of equal measure. The collective’s Spring/Summer 2020 collection in particular boasts a medley of counter-propaganda graphic T-shirts as well as utilitarian cargo pants and hoodies. A standout print from their latest collection is the Rorschach-inspired inkblot that gives the line a distinctly charming DIY feel – as with most of the brand’s offerings.   What’s next: Fans of the collective can look forward to their Fall/Winter 2020 collection, ‘Plastic Surgery’, which is currently in the works. As of press time no additional information is available – but watch this space.   Shop it here  1. Youths In Balaclava
Hit this up for: Utilitarian-inspired streetwear.   Who’s behind it: This 13-member Adrian Joffe-endorsed Singaporean design collective may have only been introduced to the fashion world three years ago, but they’ve already got a list of impressive accolades to their name. Think: fronting a global Converse campaign, hosting a wildly successful pop-up store, and as of late, debuting their Spring/Summer 2020 collection ‘Lost In Transit’ at Paris Fashion Week.   What: With Youth In Balaclava’s championing of individuality comes clothes of equal measure. The collective’s Spring/Summer 2020 collection in particular boasts a medley of counter-propaganda graphic T-shirts as well as utilitarian cargo pants and hoodies. A standout print from their latest collection is the Rorschach-inspired inkblot that gives the line a distinctly charming DIY feel – as with most of the brand’s offerings.   What’s next: Fans of the collective can look forward to their Fall/Winter 2020 collection, ‘Plastic Surgery’, which is currently in the works. As of press time no additional information is available – but watch this space.   Shop it here  1. Youths In Balaclava
Hit this up for: Utilitarian-inspired streetwear.   Who’s behind it: This 13-member Adrian Joffe-endorsed Singaporean design collective may have only been introduced to the fashion world three years ago, but they’ve already got a list of impressive accolades to their name. Think: fronting a global Converse campaign, hosting a wildly successful pop-up store, and as of late, debuting their Spring/Summer 2020 collection ‘Lost In Transit’ at Paris Fashion Week.   What: With Youth In Balaclava’s championing of individuality comes clothes of equal measure. The collective’s Spring/Summer 2020 collection in particular boasts a medley of counter-propaganda graphic T-shirts as well as utilitarian cargo pants and hoodies. A standout print from their latest collection is the Rorschach-inspired inkblot that gives the line a distinctly charming DIY feel – as with most of the brand’s offerings.   What’s next: Fans of the collective can look forward to their Fall/Winter 2020 collection, ‘Plastic Surgery’, which is currently in the works. As of press time no additional information is available – but watch this space.   Shop it here  2. Rye
Hit this up for: Everyday wardrobe basics.   Who’s behind it: Launched in 2016 by fashion designer Bessie Ye, womenswear label Rye has since found itself as part of a growing movement of trend-defying brands in Singapore. Ye, whose past experiences include an internship with Australian-Japanese designer Akira Isogawa and Singaporean clothing label Womb, has now found her groove with a clothing line that speaks to the mindful minimalist at heart.   What: Rye’s DNA is tightly interwoven with the brand’s “less is more” ethos. Over the years, the label has become synonymous with its interpretation of wallet-friendly wardrobe essentials such as knitted tops, shirts, pleated skirts and asymmetrical dresses. The brand’s neutral colour palette of beige, navy, black and olive also add to the timeless sensibilities of its designs – so if you’re looking to start building a chic capsule wardrobe, this might be a good place to begin.   What’s next: For its upcoming pieces, Rye will be introducing items such as slouch men’s T-shirts, tunic tanks and tent dresses as a means of focusing on “laid back, off-duty dressing”.   Shop it here 2. Rye
Hit this up for: Everyday wardrobe basics.   Who’s behind it: Launched in 2016 by fashion designer Bessie Ye, womenswear label Rye has since found itself as part of a growing movement of trend-defying brands in Singapore. Ye, whose past experiences include an internship with Australian-Japanese designer Akira Isogawa and Singaporean clothing label Womb, has now found her groove with a clothing line that speaks to the mindful minimalist at heart.   What: Rye’s DNA is tightly interwoven with the brand’s “less is more” ethos. Over the years, the label has become synonymous with its interpretation of wallet-friendly wardrobe essentials such as knitted tops, shirts, pleated skirts and asymmetrical dresses. The brand’s neutral colour palette of beige, navy, black and olive also add to the timeless sensibilities of its designs – so if you’re looking to start building a chic capsule wardrobe, this might be a good place to begin.   What’s next: For its upcoming pieces, Rye will be introducing items such as slouch men’s T-shirts, tunic tanks and tent dresses as a means of focusing on “laid back, off-duty dressing”.   Shop it here 2. Rye
Hit this up for: Everyday wardrobe basics.   Who’s behind it: Launched in 2016 by fashion designer Bessie Ye, womenswear label Rye has since found itself as part of a growing movement of trend-defying brands in Singapore. Ye, whose past experiences include an internship with Australian-Japanese designer Akira Isogawa and Singaporean clothing label Womb, has now found her groove with a clothing line that speaks to the mindful minimalist at heart.   What: Rye’s DNA is tightly interwoven with the brand’s “less is more” ethos. Over the years, the label has become synonymous with its interpretation of wallet-friendly wardrobe essentials such as knitted tops, shirts, pleated skirts and asymmetrical dresses. The brand’s neutral colour palette of beige, navy, black and olive also add to the timeless sensibilities of its designs – so if you’re looking to start building a chic capsule wardrobe, this might be a good place to begin.   What’s next: For its upcoming pieces, Rye will be introducing items such as slouch men’s T-shirts, tunic tanks and tent dresses as a means of focusing on “laid back, off-duty dressing”.   Shop it here 3. Playhood
Hit this up for: One-of-a-kind hand-painted denim jackets.   Who’s behind it: Playhood is the two-year-old streetwear label helmed by 26-year-old London College of Fashion fashion design alumna Sarah Lai.   What: If florals-imbued denim and ’90s-inspired threads are your thing, then this kitsch-meets-skater-girl label is definitely worth checking out. Though Lai’s hand-painted, customisable vintage denim jackets – one of which has found itself on local rapper Yung Raja as of late – seem to be the star of the show, the rest of Playhood’s offerings are just as carefree and playful. Think a line-up of bucket hats, hand-painted Vans sneakers, Hawaiian shirts, graphic T-shirts and tote bags. All customised designs start with a consultation from Lai herself and take between one to three months to execute.   What’s next: As of press time, the Playhood team is working on launching its biggest ready-to-wear collection that will consist of all-matching looks, accessories, and bags. According to Lai, the label is also working on a collaboration with a local influencer-meets-jewellery-designer. That’s a big hint if you’re into the local streetwear scene.   Shop it here  3. Playhood
Hit this up for: One-of-a-kind hand-painted denim jackets.   Who’s behind it: Playhood is the two-year-old streetwear label helmed by 26-year-old London College of Fashion fashion design alumna Sarah Lai.   What: If florals-imbued denim and ’90s-inspired threads are your thing, then this kitsch-meets-skater-girl label is definitely worth checking out. Though Lai’s hand-painted, customisable vintage denim jackets – one of which has found itself on local rapper Yung Raja as of late – seem to be the star of the show, the rest of Playhood’s offerings are just as carefree and playful. Think a line-up of bucket hats, hand-painted Vans sneakers, Hawaiian shirts, graphic T-shirts and tote bags. All customised designs start with a consultation from Lai herself and take between one to three months to execute.   What’s next: As of press time, the Playhood team is working on launching its biggest ready-to-wear collection that will consist of all-matching looks, accessories, and bags. According to Lai, the label is also working on a collaboration with a local influencer-meets-jewellery-designer. That’s a big hint if you’re into the local streetwear scene.   Shop it here  3. Playhood
Hit this up for: One-of-a-kind hand-painted denim jackets.   Who’s behind it: Playhood is the two-year-old streetwear label helmed by 26-year-old London College of Fashion fashion design alumna Sarah Lai.   What: If florals-imbued denim and ’90s-inspired threads are your thing, then this kitsch-meets-skater-girl label is definitely worth checking out. Though Lai’s hand-painted, customisable vintage denim jackets – one of which has found itself on local rapper Yung Raja as of late – seem to be the star of the show, the rest of Playhood’s offerings are just as carefree and playful. Think a line-up of bucket hats, hand-painted Vans sneakers, Hawaiian shirts, graphic T-shirts and tote bags. All customised designs start with a consultation from Lai herself and take between one to three months to execute.   What’s next: As of press time, the Playhood team is working on launching its biggest ready-to-wear collection that will consist of all-matching looks, accessories, and bags. According to Lai, the label is also working on a collaboration with a local influencer-meets-jewellery-designer. That’s a big hint if you’re into the local streetwear scene.   Shop it here  4. Gin Lee
Hit this up for: Colourful and statement-making pleated dresses.   Who’s behind it: Founded in 2011, the womenswear label helmed by husband and wife duo – Singaporean Central Saint Martins graduate Gin Lee and Israeli industrial designer Tamir Niv. Prior to setting up the brand, Lee racked up experience at fashion house Karen Millen and Hong Kong-based supply chain, Li & Fung.   What: Though Gin Lee’s designs do veer on the side of minimalist, the brand has upped the ante with its signature pleating technique – the duo attributes this to their eye for 3D detailing – as well as its affinity for colour. The result is a mix of draped dresses, pleated skirts, and lightweight blouses that have found a middle ground between structured and relaxed – a combination that makes the label’s offerings true day-to-night outfit contenders.   What’s next: In a bid to curb waste, Gin Lee has most recently launched an ‘order on demand’ purchasing system which allows the label to utilise an accurate amount of resources. Customers who choose to buy items from the brand through their OOD system will receive a 15 per cent discount.   Shop it here   4. Gin Lee
Hit this up for: Colourful and statement-making pleated dresses.   Who’s behind it: Founded in 2011, the womenswear label helmed by husband and wife duo – Singaporean Central Saint Martins graduate Gin Lee and Israeli industrial designer Tamir Niv. Prior to setting up the brand, Lee racked up experience at fashion house Karen Millen and Hong Kong-based supply chain, Li & Fung.   What: Though Gin Lee’s designs do veer on the side of minimalist, the brand has upped the ante with its signature pleating technique – the duo attributes this to their eye for 3D detailing – as well as its affinity for colour. The result is a mix of draped dresses, pleated skirts, and lightweight blouses that have found a middle ground between structured and relaxed – a combination that makes the label’s offerings true day-to-night outfit contenders.   What’s next: In a bid to curb waste, Gin Lee has most recently launched an ‘order on demand’ purchasing system which allows the label to utilise an accurate amount of resources. Customers who choose to buy items from the brand through their OOD system will receive a 15 per cent discount.   Shop it here 4. Gin Lee
Hit this up for: Colourful and statement-making pleated dresses.   Who’s behind it: Founded in 2011, the womenswear label helmed by husband and wife duo – Singaporean Central Saint Martins graduate Gin Lee and Israeli industrial designer Tamir Niv. Prior to setting up the brand, Lee racked up experience at fashion house Karen Millen and Hong Kong-based supply chain, Li & Fung.   What: Though Gin Lee’s designs do veer on the side of minimalist, the brand has upped the ante with its signature pleating technique – the duo attributes this to their eye for 3D detailing – as well as its affinity for colour. The result is a mix of draped dresses, pleated skirts, and lightweight blouses that have found a middle ground between structured and relaxed – a combination that makes the label’s offerings true day-to-night outfit contenders.   What’s next: In a bid to curb waste, Gin Lee has most recently launched an ‘order on demand’ purchasing system which allows the label to utilise an accurate amount of resources. Customers who choose to buy items from the brand through their OOD system will receive a 15 per cent discount.   Shop it here   5. Shawna Wu
Hit this up for: Artisanal designs that span silk corsets to Chinese knot harnesses.   Who’s behind it: 25-year-old Taiwan-born Singapore-based Shawna Wu first caught our eye in 2018 with her intricate knit creations. Wu, who is a graduate of the fashion programme at Parsons, considers herself an artist over a designer – something that is reflected in the often sensuous and deeply intimate portraits of her designs. Shares Wu: “I am focusing on developing more objects of value that speak to a deeper cultural practice and are made with quality in mind – thoughtful, fun, dreamy, powerful, and hot.”   What: Wu’s current edit is small and considered, comprising silk corsets, slip dresses and intricate knot harnesses. All items are made-by-hand and materials used often include sustainably- and ethically-sourced cashmere and mohair, with a focus on minimising waste. Her knit tops, for instance, take up to three weeks to make from start to finish.   What’s next: Wu is currently open for commissioned work that can range from custom orders to creative projects like music videos and films.   To shop, simply DM her here    5. Shawna Wu
Hit this up for: Artisanal designs that span silk corsets to Chinese knot harnesses.   Who’s behind it: 25-year-old Taiwan-born Singapore-based Shawna Wu first caught our eye in 2018 with her intricate knit creations. Wu, who is a graduate of the fashion programme at Parsons, considers herself an artist over a designer – something that is reflected in the often sensuous and deeply intimate portraits of her designs. Shares Wu: “I am focusing on developing more objects of value that speak to a deeper cultural practice and are made with quality in mind – thoughtful, fun, dreamy, powerful, and hot.”   What: Wu’s current edit is small and considered, comprising silk corsets, slip dresses and intricate knot harnesses. All items are made-by-hand and materials used often include sustainably- and ethically-sourced cashmere and mohair, with a focus on minimising waste. Her knit tops, for instance, take up to three weeks to make from start to finish.   What’s next: Wu is currently open for commissioned work that can range from custom orders to creative projects like music videos and films.   To shop, simply DM her here  5. Shawna Wu
Hit this up for: Artisanal designs that span silk corsets to Chinese knot harnesses.   Who’s behind it: 25-year-old Taiwan-born Singapore-based Shawna Wu first caught our eye in 2018 with her intricate knit creations. Wu, who is a graduate of the fashion programme at Parsons, considers herself an artist over a designer – something that is reflected in the often sensuous and deeply intimate portraits of her designs. Shares Wu: “I am focusing on developing more objects of value that speak to a deeper cultural practice and are made with quality in mind – thoughtful, fun, dreamy, powerful, and hot.”   What: Wu’s current edit is small and considered, comprising silk corsets, slip dresses and intricate knot harnesses. All items are made-by-hand and materials used often include sustainably- and ethically-sourced cashmere and mohair, with a focus on minimising waste. Her knit tops, for instance, take up to three weeks to make from start to finish.   What’s next: Wu is currently open for commissioned work that can range from custom orders to creative projects like music videos and films.   To shop, simply DM her here  6. Inventory
Hit this up for: Contemporary tailored designs.   Who’s behind it: Sisters Olivia and Amanda Lin who founded Inventory back in 2016 have quickly made an impression on the style set with their custom-made designs. While Olivia’s past experiences include menswear tailoring and working for Singapore Tyler Print Institute, Amanda has worked as a graphic designer for branding agency Ffurious.   What: Inventory’s made-to-measure services range from making shirts, suits, vests and trousers to streetwear staples such as biker jackets and jeans. Its ethos remains to design items that are long-lasting. “Our aim is to create a collection of staples that can be worn for a lifetime, and are passed down generations,” shares Amanda. As a result, the label makes it a point to work with local craftsmen using tried-and-tested tailoring techniques passed down from generations. All pieces are fitted in-house and take between two to eight weeks to design.   What’s next: As of press time, the duo is looking to complete their planned collaborations with a set of creatives – no word as of who yet – and are hoping to launch these over the next year.   Shop it here  6. Inventory
Hit this up for: Contemporary tailored designs.   Who’s behind it: Sisters Olivia and Amanda Lin who founded Inventory back in 2016 have quickly made an impression on the style set with their custom-made designs. While Olivia’s past experiences include menswear tailoring and working for Singapore Tyler Print Institute, Amanda has worked as a graphic designer for branding agency Ffurious.   What: Inventory’s made-to-measure services range from making shirts, suits, vests and trousers to streetwear staples such as biker jackets and jeans. Its ethos remains to design items that are long-lasting. “Our aim is to create a collection of staples that can be worn for a lifetime, and are passed down generations,” shares Amanda. As a result, the label makes it a point to work with local craftsmen using tried-and-tested tailoring techniques passed down from generations. All pieces are fitted in-house and take between two to eight weeks to design.   What’s next: As of press time, the duo is looking to complete their planned collaborations with a set of creatives – no word as of who yet – and are hoping to launch these over the next year.   Shop it here  6. Inventory
Hit this up for: Contemporary tailored designs.   Who’s behind it: Sisters Olivia and Amanda Lin who founded Inventory back in 2016 have quickly made an impression on the style set with their custom-made designs. While Olivia’s past experiences include menswear tailoring and working for Singapore Tyler Print Institute, Amanda has worked as a graphic designer for branding agency Ffurious.   What: Inventory’s made-to-measure services range from making shirts, suits, vests and trousers to streetwear staples such as biker jackets and jeans. Its ethos remains to design items that are long-lasting. “Our aim is to create a collection of staples that can be worn for a lifetime, and are passed down generations,” shares Amanda. As a result, the label makes it a point to work with local craftsmen using tried-and-tested tailoring techniques passed down from generations. All pieces are fitted in-house and take between two to eight weeks to design.   What’s next: As of press time, the duo is looking to complete their planned collaborations with a set of creatives – no word as of who yet – and are hoping to launch these over the next year.   Shop it here  7. In Good Company
Hit this up for: Dressier, structured wardrobe staples.   Who’s behind it: First established in 2013 by Jaclyn Teo, Juliene Aw, Sven Tan and Kane Tan, the four are no strangers to the local fashion scene. They were part of the vanguard of local designers in the Singapore fashion scene in the mid-aughts, working for the now-defunct label Alldressedup.   What: The brand differentiates itself by mostly focusing on structured silhouettes. The result is a vibrant-meets-polished line up of blazers, jumpsuits, shirt dresses, Japanese denim jeans and blouses – as well as an accompanying range of structural fashion jewellery. The label drops its latest collection on its website today, so head on down for a look at its brand new designs.   What’s next: Apart from launching their latest collection, In Good Company will also be offering up their website platform for other local labels to sell their goods during these turbulent times. Some names that are currently included are: ice-creamery Birds of Paradise, Plain Vanilla Bakery as well as Fossa Chocolate, Books Actually, The Gentle Label and Super Farmers.   Shop it here  7. In Good Company
Hit this up for: Dressier, structured wardrobe staples.   Who’s behind it: First established in 2013 by Jaclyn Teo, Juliene Aw, Sven Tan and Kane Tan, the four are no strangers to the local fashion scene. They were part of the vanguard of local designers in the Singapore fashion scene in the mid-aughts, working for the now-defunct label Alldressedup.   What: The brand differentiates itself by mostly focusing on structured silhouettes. The result is a vibrant-meets-polished line up of blazers, jumpsuits, shirt dresses, Japanese denim jeans and blouses – as well as an accompanying range of structural fashion jewellery. The label drops its latest collection on its website today, so head on down for a look at its brand new designs.   What’s next: Apart from launching their latest collection, In Good Company will also be offering up their website platform for other local labels to sell their goods during these turbulent times. Some names that are currently included are: ice-creamery Birds of Paradise, Plain Vanilla Bakery as well as Fossa Chocolate, Books Actually, The Gentle Label and Super Farmers.   Shop it here  7. In Good Company
Hit this up for: Dressier, structured wardrobe staples.   Who’s behind it: First established in 2013 by Jaclyn Teo, Juliene Aw, Sven Tan and Kane Tan, the four are no strangers to the local fashion scene. They were part of the vanguard of local designers in the Singapore fashion scene in the mid-aughts, working for the now-defunct label Alldressedup.   What: The brand differentiates itself by mostly focusing on structured silhouettes. The result is a vibrant-meets-polished line up of blazers, jumpsuits, shirt dresses, Japanese denim jeans and blouses – as well as an accompanying range of structural fashion jewellery. The label drops its latest collection on its website today, so head on down for a look at its brand new designs.   What’s next: Apart from launching their latest collection, In Good Company will also be offering up their website platform for other local labels to sell their goods during these turbulent times. Some names that are currently included are: ice-creamery Birds of Paradise, Plain Vanilla Bakery as well as Fossa Chocolate, Books Actually, The Gentle Label and Super Farmers.   Shop it here  8. Esse The Label
Hit this up for: Eco-friendly and versatile wardrobe staples.   Who’s behind it: Set up in 2017, Esse The Label is the brainchild of designer Alicia Tsi who left her full-time job to pursue a ready-to-wear brand that specialised in quality, long-lasting investment pieces that merge conscious design with style.   What: As a means of championing sustainability, the brand also practices a seasonless approach to its designs. Known primarily for their versatile separates – most of which can be worn multiple ways – one can expect items like linen crop tops and overalls, organic cotton maxi dresses and drawstring capris. Other eco-friendly materials used include pro-viscose and Tencel.   What’s next: In an effort to implement a more transparent business model, Esse The Label will be spotlighting the factories that produce all their products. The brand is also aiming for zero waste through the launch of a recycling initiative that will encourage customers to donate items they don’t need.   Shop it here 8. Esse The Label
Hit this up for: Eco-friendly and versatile wardrobe staples.   Who’s behind it: Set up in 2017, Esse The Label is the brainchild of designer Alicia Tsi who left her full-time job to pursue a ready-to-wear brand that specialised in quality, long-lasting investment pieces that merge conscious design with style.   What: As a means of championing sustainability, the brand also practices a seasonless approach to its designs. Known primarily for their versatile separates – most of which can be worn multiple ways – one can expect items like linen crop tops and overalls, organic cotton maxi dresses and drawstring capris. Other eco-friendly materials used include pro-viscose and Tencel.   What’s next: In an effort to implement a more transparent business model, Esse The Label will be spotlighting the factories that produce all their products. The brand is also aiming for zero waste through the launch of a recycling initiative that will encourage customers to donate items they don’t need.   Shop it here 8. Esse The Label
Hit this up for: Eco-friendly and versatile wardrobe staples.   Who’s behind it: Set up in 2017, Esse The Label is the brainchild of designer Alicia Tsi who left her full-time job to pursue a ready-to-wear brand that specialised in quality, long-lasting investment pieces that merge conscious design with style.   What: As a means of championing sustainability, the brand also practices a seasonless approach to its designs. Known primarily for their versatile separates – most of which can be worn multiple ways – one can expect items like linen crop tops and overalls, organic cotton maxi dresses and drawstring capris. Other eco-friendly materials used include pro-viscose and Tencel.   What’s next: In an effort to implement a more transparent business model, Esse The Label will be spotlighting the factories that produce all their products. The brand is also aiming for zero waste through the launch of a recycling initiative that will encourage customers to donate items they don’t need.   Shop it here 9. Biro
Hit this up for: Artisanal Japanese-made menswear and unisex denim designs.   Who’s behind it: Textile aficionados and brothers Kenghow and Kage Chong set up menswear label Biro in 2013 to provide top quality tailoring and materials by way of vintage-meets-utilitarian fits to a local audience. The duo also helms a lifestyle extension of their fashion label, Shouten by Biro, which encapsulates the brand’s penchant for considered creation and sells items such as glass mugs, cutlery sets and ballpoint pens.   What: Customers can expect a sleek curation of items such as 100 per cent premium Japanese denim drawstring trousers, patchwork shirts and denim jackets – most of which are sewn together with vintage appliances adding to the brand’s affinity for raw and sometimes frayed finishes. While Biro is primarily a menswear label, some items – such as the denim drawstring trousers – are also unisex and can be worn by women.   What’s next: With the launch of the Biro’s F.Classic line – which expands on the labels end-goal long-lasting classics – the duo are committed to implementing more transparency and connectivity with regards to their designs, through introducing consumers to the textiles as well as stories behind each item of clothing.   Shop it here   9. Biro
Hit this up for: Artisanal Japanese-made menswear and unisex denim designs.   Who’s behind it: Textile aficionados and brothers Kenghow and Kage Chong set up menswear label Biro in 2013 to provide top quality tailoring and materials by way of vintage-meets-utilitarian fits to a local audience. The duo also helms a lifestyle extension of their fashion label, Shouten by Biro, which encapsulates the brand’s penchant for considered creation and sells items such as glass mugs, cutlery sets and ballpoint pens.   What: Customers can expect a sleek curation of items such as 100 per cent premium Japanese denim drawstring trousers, patchwork shirts and denim jackets – most of which are sewn together with vintage appliances adding to the brand’s affinity for raw and sometimes frayed finishes. While Biro is primarily a menswear label, some items – such as the denim drawstring trousers – are also unisex and can be worn by women.   What’s next: With the launch of the Biro’s F.Classic line – which expands on the labels end-goal long-lasting classics – the duo are committed to implementing more transparency and connectivity with regards to their designs, through introducing consumers to the textiles as well as stories behind each item of clothing.   Shop it here   9. Biro
Hit this up for: Artisanal Japanese-made menswear and unisex denim designs.   Who’s behind it: Textile aficionados and brothers Kenghow and Kage Chong set up menswear label Biro in 2013 to provide top quality tailoring and materials by way of vintage-meets-utilitarian fits to a local audience. The duo also helms a lifestyle extension of their fashion label, Shouten by Biro, which encapsulates the brand’s penchant for considered creation and sells items such as glass mugs, cutlery sets and ballpoint pens.   What: Customers can expect a sleek curation of items such as 100 per cent premium Japanese denim drawstring trousers, patchwork shirts and denim jackets – most of which are sewn together with vintage appliances adding to the brand’s affinity for raw and sometimes frayed finishes. While Biro is primarily a menswear label, some items – such as the denim drawstring trousers – are also unisex and can be worn by women.   What’s next: With the launch of the Biro’s F.Classic line – which expands on the labels end-goal long-lasting classics – the duo are committed to implementing more transparency and connectivity with regards to their designs, through introducing consumers to the textiles as well as stories behind each item of clothing.   Shop it here